Megan Reynolds

There’s a lot of roles out there calling for creativity, and in the post-Covid world, many different ways to manage them. We talk to a freelance stylist and a market director, to see how they’re making WFH work for them.



MAINTAINING COMMUNITY IN THIS (VIRTUAL) REALITY

 

As the Market Director at Matches Fashion, Megan Reynold’s pre-lockdown life was as jet-set as you would imagine from a high-profile fashion industry insider – frequent trips to see designers in Milan and Paris, commuting to the company’s offices in London Bridge and planning the occasional weekend getaway.

 

All this ground to a halt in this new reality where your office is in your home and what you wear to work only matters from the waist up. Whilst still adapting to this “new normal” like everybody else, Megan has been embracing being fully in control of her time, taking advantage of the flexibility to change up the scenery and work a lot from her garden whilst maintaining an open and informed environment for her team.

 

TELL US A BIT ABOUT HOW LIFE HAS CHANGED SINCE LOCKDOWN?

 

My life day-to-day prior to lockdown was so varied, needless to say, that has all been flipped on its head. My days working from home, and weekends that frame them, are now more routine but no less full. My time now feels more in my control without flights and travel, and with this has come an added sense of responsibility to achieve everything I set out to do each day.

 

HOW LONG DID IT TAKE YOU TO ADAPT TO A NEW WORKING ROUTINE?

 

I personally am still adapting and think we will have to adapt with every changing day. With my manager hat on, I want to make sure each person in the team feels their experience is being taken into account as we navigate this “new normal”.

 

IS IT A STRUGGLE TO MANAGE A TEAM THROUGH VIRTUAL COMMUNICATION?

 

Missing the near-daily opportunity to connect with team members in person has been difficult. Some elements of human interaction you simply can’t transmit over a Zoom call. Intuition on how someone is feeling, for example, and in turn what extra care can be given to them. So personally, I’m trying to rise to the challenge of creating a warm, open, informed environment.



IT MUST BE DIFFICULT TO BUILD A SENSE OF COMMUNITY IN YOUR COMPANY WHEN YOU’RE NOT PHYSICALLY TOGETHER.

 

A big factor is being organized about how you get information out to the team and how transparent you are in your delivery. When people feel informed and part of decision-making processes, that helps everyone not just feel part of something, they truly are an important part of an organization they hopefully feel they have helped to build. 

 

HOW DO YOU LOOK YOUR BEST ON ZOOM MEETINGS?

 

What is practical and expressive for me is a comfortable, yet stylish blouse paired with a fluid trouser, short or skirt. While this (virtual) reality is new, I have kept up with the ritual of getting dressed and have a new appreciation that it has always signified starting your day with intent, promise and (hopefully) a bit of confidence.

 

WHAT HAS BEEN THE MOST IMPORTANT TAKEAWAY FOR YOU FROM ALL THE RECENT CHANGES TO YOUR WORKING LIFE?

 

This pandemic has been an accelerator. Underlying change that has needed to happen for a long time finally is. It has catapulted everyone to address issues, to be a captive audience, to listen and in turn act. I think we were all perhaps guilty of complacency from time to time and now turning to a new chapter of being an active participant in the positive change I believe in.

 

WHAT PODCASTS ARE YOU LISTENING TO IN ORDER TO STAY INSPIRED?

 

This is one of my favourite topics and there are too many to choose from, but I will go with one highlight from three different genres. News: I listen to The Daily every weekday religiously. Business: Work Like A Woman with Mary Portas invigorates me to be the best business person I can be which starts with being kind and breaking down the institutional workplace culture often built on toxic masculine ideals. Culture: I also have just finished 1619 which Nikole Hannah-Jones brilliantly moderates by weaving together America’s past and the impact slavery has had on the modern world.